6 MONTH Money-Back Guarantee

10% off $250+, 15% off $1000+

Free Shipping on US Domestic orders $75+

If you're like most gardeners, you probably have a love/hate relationship with insects. You love the beautiful blooms they give your garden via pollination but hate the damage they can do to your plants. Among the different types of insects that can cause harm to plants, aphids and mites are two of the most common species. While they may look similar, these two pests are actually quite different. In this blog post, we'll compare and contrast root aphids vs. soil mites so that you can tell them apart and deal with them accordingly.

What are aphids and mites?

Root aphids feed on plant roots and can cause the plant to lose leaves and wilt. Root aphids are small, soft-bodied, greenish-white insects that feed on the roots of plants.

Soil mites on the other hand are small, soft-bodied creatures that live in soil and eat plant pests. 

Root aphids are small, white insects that feed on the roots of plants. Root aphids and soil mites both can cause damage to plants, but it's important to know how to tell them apart so you can treat the plant appropriately.

Root aphids vs. soil mites: what's the difference?

Root aphids are small, soft-bodied insects that feed on the roots of plants. They are usually black or green in color and have long antennae. Soil mites are much smaller than root aphids and are reddish-brown or yellow in color. They have short antennae and small eyes. Both root aphids and soil mites produce a sticky secretion which they use to attach themselves to plants.

These pests can be difficult to tell apart, but here are some key differences between both:

1) Root aphids are small, black insects. Soil mites are smaller creatures that are usually light brown in color.

2) Root aphids have a blunt head and lack wings while soil mites have a pointed head and wings.

3) Root aphids produce short yellow excretions while soil mites produce long white ones.

4) Root aphids are smaller and have antennae that protrude from their heads while soil mites have short antennae and wings.

5) Root aphid colonies tend to be coated in a sticky secretion, while soil mite colonies are not as densely populated with cells.

6) Root aphids secrete a sticky substance called honeydew which can cause plant growth to decrease. Soil mites don't attack plants directly, but they do feed on the honeydew created by root aphids.

What do aphids do to plants?

Aphids are small, soft-bodied insects that feed on plants. They can cause a lot of damage to plants by sucking the sap out of them or by secreting a harmful substance called honeydew. Aphids also spread disease and can be difficult to get rid of.

Aphids can cause distorted growth, stunted plants and leaves, and yellowing of the foliage. In spring and summer, root aphids lay eggs on plants' lower leaves and stems. Aphids attacking root areas below the soil line congregate in groups underground on the roots of plants causing root aphid damage.

How to identify an aphid

There are several ways to identify an aphid, but the easiest is to look for a small, red, or black creature that resembles a tick. Another way to identify an aphid is to look for its characteristics. Aphids have a characteristic “slipper” shape, and they are generally green or black. They are usually found on plants near the ground, feeding on plant sap.

In the autumn, you may see quite a few winged root aphids flying around. At this life stage, they tend to resemble fungus gnats. However, you can identify them by the tell-tale antennae  which will  protrude from their hind ends.

Additionally, aphids have small heads and long antennae. They can cause plant diseases and can be a nuisance. Once you've identified root aphids, you can use insecticides that can be moderately effective in killing root aphids. You can also avoid root aphid infestation by checking the roots of your garden plants occasionally.

How to get rid of aphids

Aphids can be a nuisance, but they're not always hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several courses of action you can take against root aphid predators if you catch them early enough. Here are five tips for getting rid of aphids throughout the root aphid life cycle.

  1. Use insecticides and always read the product label before using any of them to kill root aphids.
  2. Use a water spray to knock aphids off plants.
  3. Release parasitic wasp, to control aphids in gardens or crops biologically.
  4. Cover plant foliage with fine mesh fabric and place it inches away from the stem to trap aphids. Release biological predators, ladybugs, which feed on aphids.
  5. Aphids can also be eliminated by hand or by using a bacterial solution.
  6. Aphids prefer humid environments, so make sure to leave your plants in an area where they will receive plenty of air.
  7. Eliminate any potential food sources for aphids, such as over-ripe fruit or leaves that have been damaged by pests or disease.
  8. Keep your gardening space and free of clutter - Aphids love to hide in dirty areas, so make sure to keep your gardening area and surrounding space tidy.
  9. Use a domestic method to remove aphids - Some people recommend using soap and water, while others swear by using a homemade mixture of soap and vinegar.
  10. Try a pesticide - If you can't seem to get rid of the aphids on your own, you may want to consider using a pesticide.

What do soil mites do to plants?

Soil mites are small, eight-legged creatures that live in the soil. They eat bacteria, fungus, and other small organisms. Soil mites can also inflict a range of harm on outdoor plants, from reducing their growth rate to causing plant death. They are tiny creatures that feed on plant sap and can cause damage to plant roots and leaves. Spider mites can also spread harmful plant viruses and fungi.

How to identify a soil mite

Soil mites are tiny creatures that inhabit the soil. They're also sometimes referred to white soil mites. They help to break down organic material and are important in the healthy growth of plants. There are many different kinds of soil mites, and it can be difficult to identify them without a microscope.

The easiest way to identify soil mites is by their size. The smallest mites are about 1/50 of an inch long and the largest are about 1/5 of an inch long. Other ways to find soil mites  include identifying the type of substrate they live on and the shape of their body. Here are a few tips for identifying soil mites: 

  1. Look for small, brown, or black insects that have six legs and are about one-eighth of an inch long.
  2. If the soil is dry, mites may be seen crawling around on the surface.
  3. Check for fecal matter or eggs on the creature's body. 
  4. Check the undersides of leaves for tiny black spots or patches.
  5. Look for webbing or trails in the soil; mites use these to travel between food sources and their hiding spots.

How to get rid of soil mites

Soil mites are small creatures that can be very difficult to get rid of. However, there are a few things you can do to try and get rid of them. One method is to use a pesticide. Another is to do nothing wait until the population of soil mites gets so high that it causes damage to the plant. At this point, do what needs to be done to eliminate soil mites.You can use a natural remedy such as baking soda or garlic.

There are many ways to get rid of soil mites. Here are five of them: 

1) Use a soil fumigant

There are many soil fumigants available on the market. They come in a variety of formulations, including granules, liquids, and aerosols.

Fumigants suffocate the mites. They are applied to the soil and a plastic bag is used to cover them and create a tight seal. The fumigant is left to work for some period of time (usually 24-48 hours) and then the soil is aerated to allow the gas to dissipate.

2) Use a pesticide

Pesticides are applied to the soil and work by poisoning the mites. They come in a variety of formulations, including liquids, granules, and aerosols.

Pesticides are very effective at killing soil mites, but they can also be harmful to plants and animals. Be sure to read the label carefully and follow the directions.

4) Use a natural remedy

There are many natural remedies that can be used to get rid of soil mites. One popular remedy is to sprinkle baking soda on the soil. Another is to crush garlic and apply it to the soil.

5) Use a soil drench

Soil drenches are applied to the soil and work by drowning the mites. They come in a variety of formulations, including liquids and granules.

To use a soil drench, mix the appropriate amount of product with water according to the label directions. Apply the mixture to the affected area and water itwell. Be sure to follow the label directions carefully.

6) Use a soil fungicide

Soil fungicides are applied to the soil and work by killing the mites. They come in a variety of formulations, including liquids, granules, and consoles.

To use a soil fungicide, mix the appropriate amount of product in water according to the label directions. Apply the mixture to the affected area and water it well. Be sure to follow the label directions carefully.


7) Use diatomaceous earth

Diatomaceous earth is a powder that is applied to the soil and works by piercing the mites' shells and killing them. To use diatomaceous earth, mix the appropriate amount of product with water according to the label directions. Apply the mixture to the affected area. Be sure to follow the label directions carefully.


8) Use heat

Heat can be used to kill soil mites. One method is to solarize the soil. This is done by wetting the soil and then covering it with clear plastic for 4-6 weeks during the summer. The sun's heat will kill the mites.

Another method is to steam the soil. This is done by wetting the soil and then using a steam cleaner to apply heat to the affected area. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's directions carefully.

What to do if you have an infestation of either type of mite

If you have an infestation of either type of mite, there are a few things you can do to try and get rid of them. You can treat the area with a pesticide, use a vacuum cleaner with a high-power setting, or use a hot water and soap solution.

It is important to remember that all of these methods are only temporary fixes and will need to be repeated as the mites return.

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published