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Are you growing spaghetti squash this year? If so, you'll need to know when to pick the product when it is at its peak maturity.  Different spaghetti squash varieties have different picking times. However, the ideal time to harvest spaghetti squash is when the fruits are just starting to change color.

However, you can also wait until the fruits are fully ripe and have a yellow or orange color. In either case, make sure the skin of the spaghetti squash is firm before picking. Harvesting your spaghetti squash at the right time will ensure that they taste great!

What is spaghetti squash?

Spaghetti squash is a type of winter squash that gets its name from the stringy strands that come out during cooking. The flesh is mild in flavor and can be used as a substitute of pasta in recipes. Homegrown spaghetti squash is a healthy, low-carb alternative to pasta and can be enjoyed all year-round.

The Lifecycle Of A Squash Plant

Squash plants go through four main stages in their lifecycle:

Germination

The germination stage is when the seed sprouts and the plant starts to grow. This stage lasts for about 2-3 weeks.

Growth

The growth stage is when the plant starts to develop leaves and roots and this stage can last for several weeks.

Flowering

The flowering stage is when the plant produces flowers. This stage lasts for about 2 weeks.

Fruiting

The fruiting stage is when the plant produces fruit. This stage lasts for 3-4 months.

Fruit ripening

The fruit ripening stage is when the fruit becomes ripe and is ready to eat. This stage can last for several weeks.

How to Know When to Pick Spaghetti Squash

Squash Color

One of the best ways to tell when spaghetti squash is ripe is to check  its color. The skin of the fruit should start to turn from green to yellow or orange. If you wait until the squash is fully ripe, it will have an entirely golden yellow color.

The color of squash can tell you a lot about its ripeness. The green skin of squash means that the fruit is still immature and not ready for harvesting. On the other hand, yellow or orange squash is ripe and ready for picking.

Firmness

In addition to looking at the squash color, you'll also want to check the firmness of the fruit. The best way to check the firmness of squash is by pressing the skin of the fruit with your thumb. If the skin feels firm, then the squash is ripe. If it feels soft, then the squash is not ripe yet.

Size

The size of the squash can also tell you a lot about its ripeness. Smaller squashes are not as ripe as larger squashes. This is because they haven't had as much time to mature on the vine. Larger squashes are riper because they've had more time to mature.

Skin Dullness

Another sign that the spaghetti squash is ripe is when its skin starts to dull. The shine of the skin will lessen as the fruit ripens.

Vine Dryness

If you're not sure whether the squash is ripe or unripe, you can check the vine dryness. The vine will start to dry out and turn brown when the fruit is ripe.

What happens if you pick spaghetti squash too early?

If you pick spaghetti squashes too early, they will be more difficult to cook and eat. This is because the flesh of the immature spaghetti squash will be harder and not as stringy. The flavor will also be less sweet and blander.

What happens if you pick spaghetti squash too late?

If you pick spaghetti squash too late, it may start to rot. The skin of the squash will become soft and the fruit will be overripe. The flavor will also be sweeter and more intense.

How harvesting spaghetti squash at the right time will ensure that it lasts longer in storage

If you're harvesting spaghetti squash plants at the right time, they will last longer in storage. If you wait until ripe spaghetti squash is ready for picking, it will only last for a few weeks in storage. However, if you harvest the squash when it's just starting to turn color, it will last for 2-3 months in storage. This is because the fruit will continue to ripen and get sweeter after it has  been harvested.

Harvesting your spaghetti squash at the right time will ensure that they taste great. Unlike summer squashes, which can grow rapidly and be ready for picking within just a few weeks, winter squashes take a lot longer to reach the harvesting stage. Spaghetti squash is a healthy, low-carb alternative to pasta and can be enjoyed year-round.

So, if you're looking for a healthy, low-carb alternative to pasta, harvest spaghetti squash at the right time!

Harvesting Spaghetti Squash

Now that you know when to pick spaghetti squash, it's time to understand their harvesting process. Here are some tips to ensure that you get the job done right:

1) Use a sharp knife to cut the squash from the vine.

2) Make sure to harvest ripe squashes them before the first frost.

3) Store the spaghetti squash in a cool, dry place.

4) Use the produce within a few weeks for the best flavor.

5) Don't refrigerate the squash, as it will cause spoilage 


Following these tips will help you get the most out of your spaghetti squash harvest!

Will Spaghetti Squash Ripen Off The Vine?

Spaghetti squash will continue to ripen after being picked off the vine. However, the process will happen slower, so it's best to harvest spaghetti squashes  when they're ripe. If you wait too long to pick, the squash may start to rot.

How To Store Spaghetti Squash

Once you've picked your spaghetti squash, it's important to store them properly so they don't go bad. The best way to store them is in a cool, dry place. You can keep them in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. However, they'll taste better if you use them within a few days of picking them.

Freezing the spaghetti squash

Spaghetti squash can also be frozen. To freeze spaghetti squash,, first, cook and then let it cool completely. Once it has cooled, put the squash in a freezer-safe container and freeze for up to six months.

Canning the spaghetti squash

Another way to store spaghetti squash is by canning. To can them, first, cook squashes  and then let them cool completely. Once they've cooled, pack them in sterilized jars and cover them with boiling water. Process squashes in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes. Let the jars cool before storing. Spaghetti squash can be stored in a pantry for up to a year.

Drying the spaghetti squash

Spaghetti squash can also be dried. To dry squashes, first, cook them and then let them cool completely. Once they've cooled, slice them into thin pieces and place them on a dehydrator tray. Dry at 115 degrees Fahrenheit for six to eight hours. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place. Dried spaghetti summer squash will last for up to a year.

Pickling the spaghetti squash

Another way to preserve spaghetti squash is by pickling. To pickle them, first, cook squashes  and then let them cool completely. Once they've cooled, pack them in sterilized jars and cover them with  vinegar solution. Process in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes. Let the jars cool before storing. Spaghetti squash can be stored in a pantry for up to two years.


Now that you know all about harvesting and storing spaghetti squash, it's time to give them a try! They make a great low-carb alternative to pasta, and they're perfect for making winter dishes like soups and stews. You can bake or roast the squash, and the soft flesh can also be utilized as a delicious vegetable substitute for your pasta dishes or stir-fries! So, go ahead and add them to your menu this season!

Frequently asked questions

How Big Should I let my spaghetti squash get?

The spaghetti squash will get bigger as it ripens. However, you don't want them to get too big, or they'll be difficult to harvest. The ideal size is around six to eight inches in diameter.

Can I eat the seeds of the spaghetti squash?

Yes, you can eat the seeds of the spaghetti squash. They're actually quite nutritious and are a good source of fiber.

Is green spaghetti squash OK to eat?

Yes, green spaghetti squash is perfectly safe to eat. However, it won't be as sweet as the yellow or orange varieties.

Why does my spaghetti squash look like a watermelon?

If your spaghetti squash looks like a watermelon, it's because it's not ripe yet. It will continue to ripen after picking it from the vine.

How to cure spaghetti squash

To cure spaghetti squash, place it in a spot with good ventilation and let it sit for 5–7 days at 80–85°F. Depending on the weather at harvest, you can cure spaghetti squash outside or inside.

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